General

Charles Leclerc crashed Niki Lauda’s early 1970s Ferrari F1 car in Monaco

Charles Leclerc crashed Niki Lauda's early 1970s Ferrari F1 car in Monaco

Ferrari F1 driver Charles Leclerc is actually from Monaco. He was born there, licensed there and he has raced under that banner his entire career. If you have a legendary Ferrari F1 car at a historic race in Monaco and you need a driver, he is the best possible choice. Unfortunately, there is the matter of his luck at his home Grand Prix.

It’s worse than just never winning Monaco in any series. Leclerc has never even completed a race in Monaco. Last year he dramatically missed the start, took pole on one lap and crashed out of the weekend the next. His luck here is, to say the least, an outlier in a career otherwise highlighted by wins, poles and junior formula championships. And if you thought it would change just because he is the current F1 points leader, he refuted that today.

This content was imported from Twitter. You may be able to find the same content in a different format, or you can find more information on their website.

As part of the historic Monaco Grand Prix, Leclerc had the chance to get behind the wheel of a later specification Ferrari 312B3 owned by Methuselah Racing and previously driven by Niki Lauda. All went well until the end of his third lap, when he reported a brake failure to Rascasse. Leclerc spun in the middle of the corner before backing into the barrier, damaging at least the rear wing and part of the body of the iconic car.

This content was imported from Twitter. You may be able to find the same content in a different format, or you can find more information on their website.

Leclerc tweeted about the incident shortly afterwards, again stating that a sudden brake failure was the reason for the crash. He will be back in Monaco in two weeks for the Grand Prix with his F1 championship lead on the line, so he will have to hope his time on the legendary track in Ferrari’s 2022 challenger is better than his times here in 1974 , 2019 and 2021 cars.

This content is created and maintained by a third party and imported to this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may find more information about this and similar content at piano.io