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Driver warning: electric cars may not be the best way to tackle the fuel crisis

Driver warning: electric cars may not be the best way to tackle the fuel crisis

With the prices of petrol and diesel remaining high, many motorists are wondering whether or not they should switch to electric cars. Figures indicate that the number of EVs on UK roads is increasing.

Motorists in the UK bought more electric cars in March alone than in the whole of 2019.

Moreover, according to Heycar, May saw the number of BEV registrations rise by 17.7 percent.

BEVs continued their growth streak in June 2022, with 22,737 registrations – up 14.6 percent year-on-year.

Their market share reached 16.1 percent, up from 10.7 percent in 2021.

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“Electricity prices are also rising at a record pace in this country, which means that charging electric cars is still expensive, not to mention supply chain problems and increased demand are leading to a shortage of batteries for electric vehicles. vehicles, causing the cost of EVs to rise.”

Ms Potter added: “Some motorists are still against the idea of ​​switching due to the need to charge for long journeys.

“That’s why self-charging models are preferred, but of course they still need fuel, albeit less.

“The second reason is the cost of purchasing an EV compared to a petrol or diesel car and they are not widely available on the used market yet, meaning most don’t have the option to buy one.”

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Mr. Hixon stressed that one of the greatest benefits of owning an EV is the ability to charge it at home.

However, not everyone has access to a home charger.

The expert said: “If this is not practical, there are public chargers, which cost a fraction of the fuel price, achieving 80 per cent of the power for around £30.”

Another factor to consider is the charging speed.

This is one of the biggest differences between an internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicle and an EV.

Hixon said: “Charging rates can influence people’s opinions about electric cars.

“Usually a trip to the gas station only takes five minutes, while charging an electric car can take between 15 minutes and 24 hours, depending on the charging station.

“So this can be off-putting for some, especially those with busy schedules and little time to wait for their car to charge.

“Usually, a trip to the gas station only takes five minutes, while charging an electric car can take between 15 minutes and 24 hours, depending on the charging station.”

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