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Google Maps to give the most efficient route for a car’s fuel type

Maps update: Google is currently testing an upgrade to its Maps navigation functionality that tells users the most efficient driving route depending on their car's fuel type

Google Maps will soon tell drivers the most efficient route tailored to whether they are driving a petrol, diesel, hybrid or electric car

  • Update is being tested to provide the best eco routes depending on the fuel type of the car
  • Users will tell Google Maps whether they are in a petrol, diesel, hybrid or EV. to drive
  • The app then gives them the most efficient route based on this information
  • Hybrids and EVs will most likely be told to drive on roads with lower limits to take advantage of longer range at lower speeds
  • It can take into account how hilly a route is and possible stop-start scenarios

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Google is testing a new update to its Maps that will allow drivers to navigate the most efficient route to their destination depending on the type of car they own.

Users can specify the engine type of the vehicle they are driving, choosing between petrol, diesel, hybrid and electric.

The system will then ‘compile’ the best route to give you ‘the most fuel or energy savings’, depending on the powertrain.

Maps update: Google is currently testing an upgrade to its Maps navigation functionality that tells users the most efficient driving route depending on their car's fuel type

Maps update: Google is currently testing an upgrade to its Maps navigation functionality that tells users the most efficient driving route depending on their car’s fuel type

The beta update for Google Maps was first revealed by 9to5Google.comwith the system still under development.

It will be an improvement over last year’s ‘environmentally friendly routing’ feature, which promises to reduce motorists’ carbon footprints – though warnings are being made that this could make journeys take longer.

Currently, Google Maps offers drivers an alternative to the fastest and most direct routes, where an eco-friendly option is the best for the environment.

However, the upgrade under test will modify the route based on what powers the vehicle — an internal combustion engine, batteries and electric motors — or a combination of both.

The different types all have different characteristics, not least in how they optimize fuel and energy efficiency.

This means that the routes offered to drivers of petrol and diesel cars can be very different from the routes offered to owners of electric and hybrid vehicles.

Users can specify the engine type of the vehicle they are driving, choosing between petrol, diesel, hybrid and electric.  Specific eco-friendly routes are calculated for each

Users can specify the engine type of the vehicle they are driving, choosing between petrol, diesel, hybrid and electric.  Specific eco-friendly routes are calculated for each

Users can specify the engine type of the vehicle they are driving, choosing between petrol, diesel, hybrid and electric. Specific eco-friendly routes are calculated for each

Since EVs tend to be more efficient at lower speeds and hybrids that can make the most of their limited range in and around the city, the routes for these models can be very different from those for drivers of combustion engine cars that have better fuel economy on highways.

The system can also take into account how hilly or flat a particular route is to determine if it is more efficient for the type of car being used, as well as the different types of roads it will recommend if the user is environmentally conscious.

The amount of traffic lights on the route can also be taken into account, with stop-start journeys having a greater impact on the efficiency of petrol and diesel cars than electrified alternatives.

The update is likely to bring the most benefits to hybrid and EV drivers and will be a welcome addition to Google Maps’ existing capacity to direct them to public charging stations, which has been a feature of the navigation app in the UK since 2017.

The more customized beta system is also likely to provide owners of all-electric and plug-in hybrid cars with the most range-efficient routes, bearing in mind the need to stop to replenish their on-board batteries.

Beta 11.39 of the app is currently being tested, with 9to5Google.com saying it expects EV and hybrid owners in America to wait “a few more weeks” to experience the update.

Range Anxiety Is No Longer A Major Concern… But ‘Charging Anxiety’ Is

More than half of Brits are said to have 'charging anxiety', meaning they panic if their devices are not sufficiently charged.  Volkswagen's finance arm says it could be a consumer issue for motorists when making the decision to switch to electric cars

More than half of Brits are said to have 'charging anxiety', meaning they panic if their devices are not sufficiently charged.  Volkswagen's finance arm says it could be a consumer issue for motorists when making the decision to switch to electric cars

More than half of Brits are said to have ‘charging anxiety’, meaning they panic if their devices are not sufficiently charged. Volkswagen’s finance arm says it could be a consumer issue for motorists when making the decision to switch to electric cars

A new report claims that one of the main barriers to owning an electric car is the consumer’s obsession with needing fully charged personal devices.

Volkswagen Financial Services UK (VWFS) found that more than half of Britons (55 percent) panic when they know their phone or laptop is running out of power. car ownership rather than range anxiety itself.

It says the psychological need to charge devices to maximum capacity could outweigh general skepticism about the UK’s public charging network.

The findings also show that Gen Z and millennials (77 percent) are most likely to panic if their personal device goes dead. However, this age group is most likely prepared by owning a portable charger — 68 percent, according to the poll of 2,000 people.

Mike Todd, CEO of VWFS, said: ‘Predictions from the Competition and Markets Authority suggest that up to 480,000 public charging stations will be needed in the UK by 2030, but it looks like this rollout needs to happen more quickly to reach the majority of potential EVs. drivers to make the switch to electric.

“With the installation of public charging stations in supermarkets, gyms and elsewhere, frequent top-ups rather than large weekly charges is probably the best solution for many, especially those who don’t park on the street.

“This research shows how ingrained our devices and battery life are into our daily lives, and I believe that charging an EV should be approached the same way we charge a smartphone battery – something that many easier if you have several chargers nearby. ‘

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