General

MG5 EV (2020 – 2022) Electrical Rating

MG5 EV (2020 – 2022) Electrical Rating
Expert review

Winner of our Best Dog Owner’s Car 2022, the MG5 is a great value, all-electric estate car with an endearing no-nonsense look

The verdict of the Auto Trader expert:

New available from €29,695

Forget the sleek driving gloves, the classic car image you might associate with MGs of yesteryear, as the brand has since grown into a China-backed builder of affordable everyday cars with excellent value for money and a no-nonsense image. MG’s big sell now is offering an affordable route to electrification, which is proving very popular with buyers with cars like this MG5 estate. If it’s not particularly glamorous, it’s efficient, cheap to buy and use and – as the dog owners who voted it their favorite in the 2022 Auto Trader New Car Awards will attest – it’s just as reliable and unobtrusive as a favorite pair of boots. At the time of writing, a revised MG5 with updated styling and improved technology is reaching showrooms, which we will review as soon as possible. For now, we’ll focus on the outgoing, which is fundamentally similar under the skin.

Reasons to buy:

  • tickExcellent electric powertrain
  • tickPractical and comfortable
  • tickValue for your money

Running costs for an MG MG5

Value for money is of course an important motivation for choosing an MG, but the advantage of the brand is reduced here compared to some other large EVs

All the usual electric car operating cost benefits apply to the MG5, of course, including cheaper VED/road tax and in-kind benefit, not to mention the appeal of much lower ‘fuel’ costs over a petrol or diesel car if you has room to install a home charger and can charge the battery overnight at an off-peak rate. Value for money is, of course, a major motivation for choosing an MG, but the brand advantage is diminished here compared to some other large EVs, with cars such as the Nissan Leaf, Renault Zoe and Kia Soul being priced comparably or a tempting short stretch over the monthly borrowing costs. There’s no denying that the MG looks and feels a bit cheap compared to these more desirable rivals, making the case for the MG5 perhaps a little less convincing than others in the range.

Expert rating: 4/5

Reliability of an MG MG5

It’s a smart decision to demonstrate confidence in its products by including a seven year/80,000 mile warranty

While the name has been around for years, MG acknowledges that the current range is a bit of an unknown quantity, while its Chinese heritage can be (mistakenly) misunderstood. So it’s a smart decision to demonstrate confidence in its products by including a seven year/80,000 mile warranty that can be transferred to any subsequent owners for both peace of mind and to maintain resale value in the medium to long term.

Expert rating: 4/5

Safety for an MG MG5

Under the MG Pilot branding, this wraps up the kit modern drivers expect, including brakes that engage automatically if you don’t react to a hazard ahead

Early versions of the MG5 were quite basic in terms of their safety kit and driver assistance features, but that improved significantly with the introduction of the Long Range model discussed here, and carried over to the facelifted one arriving soon. Under the MG Pilot branding, this rounds out the kit modern drivers expect, including brakes that engage automatically if you don’t react to a hazard ahead, steering adjustments to keep you in your lane and automatic cruise control to keep a safe distance. to the vehicle in front in heavy traffic. If it might be a little over-sensitive it all seems to work well enough but if you’re buying a used MG5 keep in mind that if it’s not the Long Range version the safety aids are pretty much limited to rear parking sensors!

Expert rating: 3/5

How comfortable is the MG MG5

We struggled to find a comfortable position, despite the electric adjustment of the seats and a steering wheel that allows you to adjust both height and reach

The MG5’s estate attitude is undoubtedly one of the reasons it is so popular with dog owners. The lower trunk sill makes it easier for four-legged friends to jump in the back. The same goes for loading groceries or whatever you want in the spacious boot. It’s also an advantage on the road compared to an SUV or crossover, as the suspension doesn’t need to be stiffened to handle the extra ride height. Indeed, MG has clearly prioritized comfort over handling and the 5 rolls around quite a bit in the corners, the trade-off being good isolation from lumps and bumps. From the driver’s seat we struggled to find a comfortable position, despite the electric seat adjustment and a steering wheel that allows you to adjust both height and reach – even with the latter it always felt too far away for us, while the edge on edge felt rough to touch. The cushion material on the seats isn’t particularly supportive either, the manual lumbar adjustment while it feels like someone is poking the bottom of your back behind their knees. Honestly, it’s details like this where the MG is starting to feel its price and spending a little more on the Soul, Leaf or some other big name alternative might seem worth it.

Expert rating: 3/5

Features of the MG MG5

With only two trim levels to choose from, the higher one with its faux leather, heated front seats, keyless start and other features is probably the one to go for

It’s worth noting again that we’re reviewing the outgoing version of the MG5 here, the new one gets some significant improvements, including an app that lets you manage charging via your phone and a much larger 10.25-inch central screen. Judging by the basic graphics and functionality of the 8-inch screen on our test car, it’s sorely needed, but to be honest it’s an easy system to master and the comfort of your phone’s apps is never far away. away via Apple CarPlay or Android Auto as appropriate. With only two trim levels to choose from, the higher one with its leatherette, heated front seats, keyless start and other features is probably the best choice, the new range follows a similar structure and features new technology such as a ‘vehicle to load’ . ‘ system where you can use your car as a mobile power bank with a socket for powering garden equipment, charging e-bikes or even connecting a fridge on a glamping trip. That’s not on the car you see here, but we look forward to trying on the revised version.

Expert rating: 4/5

Power for an MG MG5

In our hands, the MG5 would go about a quarter further for every kWh you put into the battery than a VW ID.3

The MG5 was launched with a smaller battery that can cover just over 200 miles on a full charge, the Long Range version tested here can last over 250 miles or, MG claims, over 300 in stop-start city rides. Sure, it seems to make very efficient use of the power it has, suggesting that MG’s electric technology is more advanced than its rather old-fashioned appearance might suggest. To put that into context, in our hands the MG5 would go about a quarter further for every kWh you put into the battery than a VW ID.3, proving that the MG literally makes your money go further, both in terms of the purchase price and ongoing costs. It’s also surprisingly fast, with an impressive pace when you need it. Too bad the motor that drives the windshield wipers seems louder than the car’s, which somewhat spoils the otherwise impressive sophistication you’d expect from an electric vehicle!

Expert rating: 4/5