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TN Cars at the Monaco Historic Grand Prix: The Best Formula 1 Cars

TN Cars at the Monaco Historic Grand Prix: The Best Formula 1 Cars

Photos: Miguel Tillous

For many the Formula 1 of the 50s, 60s and 70s was, is and will be unbeatable† Not necessarily because every last time was better, but because it combined technical development, talent behind the wheel, duels and risk in doses not seen anymore.

Also read: Living legend: The pre-1985 F1s return to the track at the Monaco Historic Grand Prix

What some don’t know is that it’s still possible to see those cars that set the category on fire spin and very fast† The appointment is in the exclusive Monaco, more precisely in the circuit of Montecarlo, without doubt one of the most emblematic for “La Máxima”.

In order to participate, the cars must be original and have a certain sporting history. Photo: Miguel Tillous.

TN Autos was there this weekend to report on the Historic Monaco Grand Prix, a race in which F1 cars from up to 1985 take to the track. And not only that: in order to participate, they must be in original condition and even fit into the advertisements of the time. A pleasure for the senses.

For every taste

Organized by the Automobile Club de Monaco (ACM), this is one of the most select and attractive events for classic car enthusiasts, as in one weekend some of the most winning machines in F1 history

The special feature of this year is that cars from until 1985while they were normal until 1980.

But it is not an exhibition.  It is serious and there are also accidents.  Photo: Miguel Tillous.
But it is not an exhibition. It is serious and there are also accidents. Photo: Miguel Tillous.

There were more than 200 cars divided into 8 categoriesand to get an idea of ​​the quality of the machines seen, there were 14 cars that were world champions at least once.

In addition, two very special anniversaries were celebrated this year. On the one hand, the 40 years of the death of Colin Chapman, the brilliant founder of Lotus; on the other hand, the 70th Anniversary of the Monaco GPthe mythical circuit of which 80% of its original layout has been preserved.

The categories of the Monaco Historic GP

Category A1. Includes pre-WWII Grand Prix cars. The predecessors of Formula 1 we know today (which were so named in 1950) are known as Grand Prix.

Category A2. They are Formula 1 between 1950 and 1960, including the entire period of glory of Juan Manuel Fangio maximum.

Category B. Includes F1 cars with 1.5 liter rear engine, from 1961 to 1965. It corresponds to the era of Jim Clark and Graham Hill, and brands such as Lotus, Lola, Brabham, BRM, Ferrari, etc.

C category. Sports cars with front engine only and covers from 1952 to 1957. There are machines from Jaguar, Maserati, Ferrari, Aston Martin, Cooper and Frazer Nash. Several Argentinians are participating in this!

Under the Sport there was the presence of several Argentinians.  One of them, with this Maserati.  Photo: Miguel Tillous.
Under the Sport there was the presence of several Argentinians. One of them, with this Maserati. Photo: Miguel Tillous.

Category D. Corresponds to the 3 liter F1. It goes from 1966 to 1972, and there are the first cars with a Cosworth engine, Ferrari 312, BRM V12. It’s the time of Jackie Stewart, Chris Amon, Graham Hill, John Surtees and so many other great drivers.

Category E. Including the F1 between 1973 and 1976, always with 3-litre engines. Maybe surnames like Lauda, ​​​​Reutemann, Fittipaldi etc. sound familiar to you. It is a category with a lot of variety of chassis and most Cosworth engines, with the exception of Ferrari, Matra or BRM

Category F. From 1977 to 1980, and corresponds to the time of the so-called “ground effect” (Lotus 78). Reutemann won with a Williams in Monaco 1980!

Category G (the novelty of this edition)† F1 cars from 1981 to 1985, always with 3 liter engines. Here comes some from Prost and Senna!

SELECCIN TN AUTOS

Our selection of best cars we saw last weekend in monaco it is based on the importance of those units, on the design and on the history they carry on their backs. And well, also a bit of our whim. Here they go one by one, with a detail of the car below each photo and the reason for the choice.

Williams FW07 Cosworth (1980)

Williams FW07 Cosworth, 1980. This example contains a special story for Argentines: when Carlos Reutemann won the first GP of the remembered 1981 season, in South Africa.  In the end, that race did not yield any points for the World Championship due to a conflict between the English constructors and the rest, but with those points Lole would have taken the title... Photo: Miguel Tillous.
Williams FW07 Cosworth, 1980. This example contains a special story for Argentines: when Carlos Reutemann won the first GP of the remembered 1981 season, in South Africa. In the end, that race did not yield any points for the World Championship due to a conflict between the English constructors and the rest, but with those points Lole would have taken the title… Photo: Miguel Tillous.

Lotus18 (1960)

Lotus 18 from 1960. The same example that won the famous Monaco GP in 1961 with none other than Stirling Moss, as well as the German GP that same season.  Photo: Miguel Tillous.
Lotus 18 from 1960. The same example that won the famous Monaco GP in 1961 with none other than Stirling Moss, as well as the German GP that same season. Photo: Miguel Tillous.

Ferrari 246 (1960)

Ferrari 246, 1960. The last front-engined Ferrari in F1, this one competed in the hands of Phill Hill.  Photo: Miguel Tillous.
Ferrari 246, 1960. The last front-engined Ferrari in F1, this one competed in the hands of Phill Hill. Photo: Miguel Tillous.

Ferrari 312 (1969)

Ferrari 312. Impossible to leave out a top ten Ferrari from the historic 312 series, especially this one from 1969. It was driven by Chris Amon and Mexican Pedro Rodríguez.  The latter achieved a 5th place in the USA.  Photo: Miguel Tillous.
Ferrari 312. Impossible to leave out a top ten Ferrari from the historic 312 series, especially this one from 1969. It was driven by Chris Amon and Mexican Pedro Rodríguez. The latter achieved a 5th place in the USA. Photo: Miguel Tillous.

Alfa Romeo P3

Alfa Romeo P3.  Dominant car in its time, when they competed within the structure of the Ferrari team.  His pilots: Nuvolari, Varzi, Chiron and Moll, among others.  Photo: Miguel Tillous.
Alfa Romeo P3. Dominant car in its time, when they competed within the structure of the Ferrari team. His pilots: Nuvolari, Varzi, Chiron and Moll, among others. Photo: Miguel Tillous.

Cooper T60-Climax

Cooper T60-Climax, winning car with Bruce McLaren in Monaco during the 1962 season. Photo: Miguel Tillous.
Cooper T60-Climax, winning car with Bruce McLaren in Monaco during the 1962 season. Photo: Miguel Tillous.

Aston Martin DB3S (1955)

Aston Martin DB3 S. This incredible 1955 sports car is considered one of the most important - if not the most surviving - of this model.  He got the 2nd.  driven twice at Le Mans.  Photo: Miguel Tillous.
Aston Martin DB3 S. This incredible 1955 sports car is considered one of the most important – if not the most surviving – of this model. He got the 2nd. placed twice at Le Mans. Photo: Miguel Tillous.

Lotus 87 Cosworth (1982)

Lotus 87 Cosworth, 1982. Winner in Austria that season with Elio de Angelis.  It was the last Lotus to win, powered by a Cosworth engine.  Photo: Miguel Tillous.
Lotus 87 Cosworth, 1982. Winner in Austria that season with Elio de Angelis. It was the last Lotus to win, powered by a Cosworth engine. Photo: Miguel Tillous.

Matra MS120C (1962)

1962 Matra MS 120C. This car could never win a GP, so we put it up to a purely subjective matter.  Its design and the incredible sound of its 12 cylinders, reason enough.  Photo: Miguel Tillous.
1962 Matra MS 120C. This car could never win a GP, so we put it up to a purely subjective matter. Its design and the incredible sound of its 12 cylinders, reason enough. Photo: Miguel Tillous.